Julio Paye Mamani, Copacabana Bolivia - Espresso Roast

Cherry, Guava, Mandarin

$20.00 

  • Julio Paye Mamani, Copacabana Bolivia - Espresso Roast
  • Julio Paye Mamani, Copacabana Bolivia - Espresso Roast
  • Julio Paye Mamani, Copacabana Bolivia - Espresso Roast
  • Julio Paye Mamani, Copacabana Bolivia - Espresso Roast
  • Julio Paye Mamani, Copacabana Bolivia - Espresso Roast
  • Julio Paye Mamani, Copacabana Bolivia - Espresso Roast
  • Julio Paye Mamani, Copacabana Bolivia - Espresso Roast
  • Julio Paye Mamani, Copacabana Bolivia - Espresso Roast
  • Julio Paye Mamani, Copacabana Bolivia - Espresso Roast

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COUNTRY Bolivia
PROVINCE Caranavi
COLONY Copacabana
ALTITUDE 1,500m above sea level
VARIETY Caturra, Catuai
PROCESSING Washed
PRODUCERS Julio Paye Mamani and Lupe Medina
FARM NAME Finca San Bartolomé

 

This coffee was produced by Julio Paye Mamani and Lupe Medina from Copacabana, a small and remote settlement located 180 kilometres from La Paz in the heart of the Caranavi province. This region is the epicentre for specialty coffee production in Bolivia, with incredibly high altitudes, rich soil, and wide daily temperature ranges providing the perfect conditions for exceptional coffee.

The inhabitants of Copacabana first began farming coffee around 40 years ago. The farms here are small and traditional. Almost all work is carried out by the farm’s owners and their extended families, with a handful of temporary workers taken on to help out during harvest. All of the producers at Copacabana were born into the Aymara, an ancient indigenous group that lived on the Altiplano (a vast plateau of the central Andes that stretches from southern Peru to Bolivia and into northern Chile and Argentina). The region was known for the world’s highest lake, called Titicaca, and when their families moved to Caranavi, they named their ‘colony’, or settlement, Copacabana.

Julio and Lupe have a three-hectare farm called San Bartolomé, which is named after Julio’s father. Julio has lived in the region since he was 10. He inherited the farm from his father and together with his wife Lupe, he has farmed the land for 25 years.

For many years Julio and Lupe (like many families in Copacabana) used to depend on the local market to sell their coffee, meaning low prices and little reliability. However, over the last decade, they have focused on producing specialty coffee, and have been able to sell their coffees for substantially higher prices to our partners at Agricafe, which processes specialty lots at their Buena Vista washing station which is located in Caranavi, close to their farm.

 

HOW THIS COFFEE WAS PROCESSED

Julio and Lupe along with a small team carefully hand-picked this coffee and delivered it to the Buena Vista washing station via taxi. This meticulously run washing station is owned Agricafe, who painstakingly process each of the exceptional specialty lots they receive separately, allowing for full traceability back to the individual farmer or colony.

Evenings at the mill are always bustling as arrivals of fresh cherries begin in the late afternoon (after the day’s picking) and continue deep into the night. It is widely known around Caranavi that only perfectly ripe cherries will be accepted by this mill and all lots are inspected on arrival prior to processing. In an arrangement somewhat unique to this mill, many farmers use taxis to deliver coffee, and by 7 pm in the evening, a long line of taxi cabs forms along the road leading to the mill.

After being inspected and weighed, this coffee was carefully sorted by weight using water and floaters were removed. It was then pulped and ‘dry fermented’ without water for around 17 hours.

The coffee was then dried slowly and carefully in a mechanical dryer (for around 75 hours with temperatures no higher than 40 ˚C). When the coffee reached 16 % humidity it was rested for 5 hours in a silo, and then carefully dried until it reached 11.5% humidity.

Once the coffee was dry, it was transported to La Paz where it was rested, and then milled Agricafe’s dry mill, La Luna. At this state-of-the-art mill, the coffee is meticulously hulled and sorted using machinery and also a team of sorters who carefully sort the coffee by hand under UV and natural light.

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